LOST IN TRANSLATION

Exhibition

Wednesday 17 January, 7:00 pm — Thursday 8 February 2018

1061 Budapest, Andrássy út. 32

LOST IN TRANSLATION

Contemporary photo exhibition in LATARKA Gallery

Opening on January 17th at 7pm

Opening speech by curator and art manager Patrycja Rup

ARTISTS: Zsuzsa Darab, Andi Galdi Vinko, Réka Hegyháti, András Ladocsi

“You can't go home again. Your childhood is lost. The friends of your youth are gone. Your present is slipping away from you. Nothing is ever the same.”
― Heraclitus of Ephesus, The fragments of the work of Heraclitus of Ephesus on nature

Lost in translation is a photographic exhibition focused on untranslatable words and emotions. It explores how longing manifests itself within a selection of contemporary photographs of young Hungarian artists. Portuguese term ‘saudade’ expresses the feeling of longing for something or someone you love that is lost. It indicates the knowledge that the object of longing may never return and can be described as the love that remains after someone is gone. The concept of ‘saudade’ is similar to Romanian ‘dor’, which refers to a type of longing for the homeland or the romanticized past. It represents a mixture of melancholy, nostalgia, wistfulness and yearning. Portuguese ‘saudade’ and Romanian ‘dor’ are regarded as some of the world’s most fascinating and enchanting terms. Yet, thanks to the complexity of their meanings and connotations, they are still considered untranslatable as they do not have simple linguistic equivalents.

Language cannot fully describe many nuances of reality but it can easily create visual representations in our head and influence our imagination. Lost in traslation reflects the diverse range of topics and ideas that contributes to contemporary investigations into nostalgia and longing, from childhood and youth sentiments, homesickness to death. Although this is a story of words and feelings that cannot be translated into any other language, young Hungarian artists interpreted them by using the photographic medium as a means of expression. It has to be highlighted that photography has a long association with nostalgia du to the fact that it is highly important in preserving visual history and collective memory. The picture mediates time, immobilizing a moment and reducing it to a two-dimensional representation of an event, person, location or circumstances. In effect, the photograph can never represent the presence since the encapsulated moment has passed and there is no chance to experience it again. Every photograph evokes memories of the past accessible specifically only through this piece.

Each of contributing artists explores different layers of nostalgia captured in words ‘saudade’ and ‘dor’ by filtering them with their own notions and private experiences creating a powerful representation for longings, fears and losses of the young generation. Pictures belonging to their personal narrations give a deep sense of what ‘saudade’ and ‘dor’ are considered to be nowadays: a somewhat melancholic feeling of incompleteness. Specifically they are marked with the kind of missingness that accompanies those who take a closer look into their past recalling all the significant moments, feelings, people and places that won’t be the same again.

Exhibition on view till February 8th

LOST IN TRANSLATION exhibition / opening speech by curator Patrycja Rup:

Good evening Ladies and Gentlemen, I am pleased to welcome you at the opening of photography exhibition Lost in translation. I have a pleasure to be a curator of this project and I would like to thank Polish Institute for this opportunity, especially Tomasz Piars, as he is the main curator of Platan and Latarka galleries. I am very glad that photographers, who I follow and whose works I admire, agreed to contribute in this exhibition: Darab Zsuzsa, Galdi Vinko Andi, Hegyháti Réka, Ladocsi András.

Lost in translation is focused on untranslatable words and emotions. It explores how longing manifests itself within selection of contemporary photographs of young Hungarian artists. We turned to the Portuguese term ‘saudade’, which expresses feeling of longing for something or someone that you love and which is lost. It indicates the knowledge that the object of longing may never return and can be described as the love that remains after someone is gone. As Brazilian artist Chico Buarque put it in his famous song: Saudade is a cleaning of the dead son’s room. The concept of ‘saudade’ is similar to Romanian ‘dor’, which refers to a type of longing for the homeland or the romanticized past. It represents a mixture of melancholy, nostalgia, wistfulness and yearning. Portuguese ‘saudade’ and Romanian ‘dor’ are regarded as some of world’s most fascinating and enchanting terms, but thanks to the complexity of their meanings and connotations, they are considered untranslatable as they don’t have simple linguistic equivalents. As we host tonight guests of different nationalities and ethnicities, I am sure that many of us can think about similar linguistic struggles with certain unique terms coming from your mother tongues.

Language cannot fully describe many nuances of the reality, but it can easily create visual representations in our head and influence the imagination. Lost in translation reflects the diverse range of topics and ideas which contributes to contemporary investigations into nostalgia and longing, from childhood and youth sentiments, homesickness to death. While this is a story of words and feelings, which can't be translated into any other language, young Hungarian artists expressed them by using the photographic medium. It has to be highlighted that photography has a long association with nostalgia, as it is highly important in preserving a visual history and collective memory. The simplest example would be the famous family album, which many of us keep, currently replaced by digital collections on online clouds.  Still the picture kept its primal function, it mediates time, and it’s immobilizing a moment and reducing it to a two-dimensional representation of an event, person, location or circumstances. In effect, the photograph can never represent the presence, as the encapsulated moment has passed and there is no chance to experience it again, that’s the core of inevitable nostalgia. Every photograph evokes memories of the past accessible specifically only through this piece.

Each of contributing artists explores different layers of nostalgia by filtering them with their own notions and private experiences, creating a powerful representation for longings, fears and losses of the young generation. Pictures belonging to their personal narrations give a deep sense of what ‘saudade’ and ‘dor’ are considered to be nowadays: a somewhat melancholic feeling of incompleteness. Specifically they are marked with the kind of missingness, which accompanies these, who take a closer look at their past recalling all the significant moments, feelings, people and places, which won’t be the same again.

Pictures of Zsuzsa Darab come from the collection ‘Again’, called by the artist herself ‘a photo therapy project’. This truly personal series deals with feelings toward important men of artist’s past. Andi Galdi Vinko in her latest project ‘Homesickland’ focuses on nostalgic feeling of coming home to Budapest, where the artist was born. This series reveals the side of Budapest unknown to tourists and newcomers with a sensitivity of a local who knows ins and outs of the city and deeply cares about it. Vinko’s works are accompanied by photographs of Andras Ladocsi, including his commercial projects and pieces from the new series ‘Gymnastics’. These represent the neonostalgic strategies and refer to the positive spirit of boyhood. On the contrary, in disquieting and dark series of Réka Hegyháti, including ‘Dead’, ‘Metamorphosis’ and ‘They grew up so fast’, we observe stills from the childhood, which explore adolescence and vanishing, bringing rather turbulent experience.

Once more I would like to say thank you and please enjoy the exhibition!

lost-in-translation-opening-speech.docx